Upper Sargent Pond Trail

Upper Sargent Pond Trail

Hiking

This trail is part of a much longer loop with Lower Sargent Pond and Grass Pond.

From the trailhead you will drop slightly and climb a bit to a small before being on a mostly flat trail. A slight climb part way in will bring you to a small downhill to the intersection for Upper Sargent Pond. The spur trail is not easily seen, but it leads left for 0.2 miles to the shore.

Elevation Gain/Loss to Destination:

~400 feet of elevation loss to the lake

Distance Round Trip:

2.8 miles

Approximate Time Round Trip:

Families with Kids: 2 to 2.5 hours

Experienced Hikers: 1 to 2 hours

Beginner Hikers: 2 to 2.5 hours

Trailhead Location:

You can find these two trailheads off the Forked Lake Road in Long Lake. Start at the three corners in Long Lake drive south toward Blue Mountain Lake on Route 28N/30. North Point Road will be on the right, in 3.0 miles – drive down North Point Road. There will be a fork in the road a few miles in; right leads to Forked Lake Campsite, left to the trailheads. Continue 3.1 miles to the trailhead on the left.

Paddling

How to Get There

From the 3-way intersection in the Hamlet of Long Lake follow Route 30/28N toward Blue Mountain Lake. Continue for just over 3-miles to North Point Road on the right. Follow North Point Road for 6.25 miles to the Sargent Ponds Wild Forest Trailhead on the left.
Overview

Upper Sargent Pond is located along a much longer trail but is easy to reach while carrying a boat. It is much better to have a light weight canoe or kayak, but a decent cart with wheels could also access you to this quaint pond.

The grassy shore at the launch area is nice for preparing for your paddle and the actual launch is easy to access. To avoid dinging your boat on the rocks along shore wade out a bit, it's very shallow here as well. Small islands and a very long eastern bay add for the romance of the pond and the eastern bay will get you a bit further from the trail. When the water is much higher you can get down the outlet a little ways.
Type of Launch

Sand and stone
Type of Carry

1.4 miles of well graded easy walking, excellent footing, wide trail
Type of Water

This pond is very shallow but even so tends to be quite calm even in foul weather.

Camping

There is great variety in the area. The trail complex has lean-tos, primitive camping sites, and backcountry camping allowed as long as the site is at least 150 feet from a water body, road, or trail.

Cross-Country Skiing and Snowshoeing

This trail is part of a much longer loop with Lower Sargent Pond and Grass Pond. But to snowshoe the entire loop, is not all that great and it would require a second car to do a traverse, one car would require the skier to walk 1.5 miles of North Point Road, not a fun walk in winter. Upper Sargent Pond is an outstanding stand-alone destination, especially for younger children who want to try a new sport.

From the trailhead you will drop slightly and climb a bit to a small hogback before being on a mostly flat trail. A slight climb part way in will bring you to a small descent to the intersection for Upper Sargent Pond. The spur trail is not easily seen, but it leads left for 0.2 miles to the shore.

Elevation:

1824 feet

Ascent:

~40 feet of elevation loss to the lake

Distance Round Trip:

2.8 miles

Approximate Time Round Trip:

Families with Kids: 2.5 to 3 hours

Experienced Snowshoers: 2 to 2.5 hours

Out of Shape Snowshoers: 2.5 to 3 hours

Trailhead Location:

You can find these two trailheads off the Forked Lake Road in Long Lake. Start at the three corners in Long Lake drive south toward Blue Mountain Lake on Route 28N/30. North Point Road will be on the right, in 3.0 miles – drive down North Point Road. There will be a fork in the road a few miles in; right leads to Forked Lake Campsite, left to the trailheads. Continue 3.1 miles to the trailhead on the left.

Difficulty: 1=easiest, 5=hardest

One: This is an easy snowshoe for all ages, and an excellent place to start out in a new sport.

Additional Important Information:

Hiking over a frozen body of water can access you to areas not seen by most in the summer. With that being said it is a dangerous activity to cross frozen water bodies and should be done with care and respect for your environment. Know the ice conditions and be prepared for anything including heavy winds, snow drifts, whiteouts, slushy conditions, and thin ice.

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