Boats & Beaches

Boats and beaches

The Adirondacks are home to vast waterways that flow from mountaintops, meander through wild forests, and stretch from scenic shorelines into deep lakes. This is a place where you're just as likely to spend a day at a sandy beach (yes, we have those!) as you are cruising in a boat. Or why not try both?

Three canoes with paddlers floating into a marshy area off of a tree-lined lake.

Motor or paddle?

From Raquette Lake to Long Lake, the Moose River to the Hudson River, the Adirondacks are unique among mountainous areas, offering miles of waterways perfect for transportation and recreation. Whether you're into paddling or something a little faster, you can find adventure along our rivers, lakes and ponds:

  • Fish the deep waters of Blue Mountain Lake for lake trout and land-locked salmon, from a rented boat (or bring your own!) or along the shore.
  • Experience the rush of a Hudson River whitewater rafting expedition!
  • Cruise Raquette Lake aboard the unique replica steamer, the W. W. Durant, and glimpse the Great Camps of the Gilded Age, or explore scenic history with a narrated ride on Blue Mountain Lake.
  • Paddle the vast, pristine backcountry of Hamilton County’s many designated lake-wilderness areas.
  • Catch the wind with a sail on Long Lake.
A classic wooden motorboat with a striped awning carries boaters on a tour on a lake.

Beautiful beach days

Hamilton County is home to a number of serene sandy beaches on sparkling waterways with great views of the surrounding wilderness! Bring a picnic or stroll over to everyone's favorite local ice cream stand for fries and a cone! Many of our beaches offer kayak and SUP rentals, have swim docks and floats, and picnic tables. The beach in Long Lake is even where you can grab a scenic float plane ride!

A sandy beach at sunset with a small wooded island in the foreground.

Leave No Trace and Love Your ADK

The magic of the Adirondacks is the result of previous generations taking a long view and protecting the mountains, lakes, and rivers within the Blue Line. That tradition continues today as we support and encourage everyone to practice Leave No Trace ethics, which help protect the lands and waters of the Adirondacks.